Tell Me On a Sunday – Interview

Tell Me On a Sunday – Interview

Below is a sneak peak of the delightfully charismatic Jodie Prenger’s question and answer session that took place in Act Two:

Jodie: Thank you so much for having me back in Bristol! I have to say I am in shock. I never get invited the same place twice! Last year I embarked on a tour of Calamity Jane, and I tell you after fourteen months of being on tour those buckskins could walk on their own!

Do you have a dream role and/or roles that you would like to play and why?

I could do with a sausage roll right now, I’m starving! Because I’m just wasting away! Dream role, dream role, dream role? I’ve got two actually, my first dream role would be to play Mama Rose in Gypsy; it’s the music, it’s the overture, it gives me tingles! And the second one, I’d love to play Dolly Levi, because of the feather hat, but it’s the music again! And it would be nice to play such strong, outspoken women because it’s nothing like me. At all. Moving on…

If the girl in Tell me on a Sunday was you, would you travel that far for a man? 

Of course! Mind you, I wouldn’t travel far for the fella I’ve got right now, he’s only from down the road! No, but I think the part of Emma, what she did, I just love the fact that Andrew Lloyd Webber and Don Black set it back into the late seventies and early eighties, I mean it’s a great era, and the fact that she went all the way out there showed how much courage she had. And I don’t think she ever found love, but I think she found herself.

Do you have any pre show rituals or routines that you like to do? 

Ooh, I do! That’s a good question that. When I walk on, I’m holding a book and it has to be on chapter six. If it’s not on chapter six, the world will end. It’s really weird, but theatre is very superstitious, it’s like you’re not really allowed to whistle back stage and you have to turn around and swear, that’s what I blame it on anyway!

If you hadn’t gone into musical theatre, what would you be doing?

I did work in a curtain shop, but I was never very good at my times table so when they used to come to pick up the curtains I’d calculated, they were either too short or too full. I’m also a fully qualified nail technician. If you want a full set, it’s twenty quid at the stage door. But really, I think I would have my ultimate dream, and it’s the same as Doris Day’s; she’s got an animal sanctuary. And I have, ladies and gentlemen, just bought myself a farm. I arrived here early today and I went to the most wonderful place, and I’m welling up now, but I went to this dog rescue centre called Happy Ever After. They do such amazing work, so if I have a day off I’m going to do a few days work there!

What’s your favourite song from the show?

Do you know, Don Black was telling us that it was his first ever collaboration with The Lord, and I just think it’s some of their greatest stuff. I came in already loving the song Tell me on a Sunday, but then found little gems. I think my favourite’s ‘Capped teeth and Caesar Salad’ it always makes me chuckle! And I love ‘Nothing like you’ve ever known’, I’ve never known a song that is just so raw. He’s not too bad at writing a couple of tunes, is he?!

Tell Me on a Sunday – Review

Tell Me on a Sunday – Review

From the age of nine, I have had a real love for the show Tell Me On a Sunday, after singing the title song at a showcase way back when. Since then I have watched four different performances of it, the most recent production starring Jodie Prenger at The Hipprodrome, Bristol.

The one woman show follows the love life of Emma, a twenty-something British girl, who moves to New York in hopes of finding ‘the one’.   (more…)

All The Way From Finland

All The Way From Finland

It looks like the beautiful offspring of a baby grand piano and an acoustic guitar, with some subtle electric guitar sound-bending levers, is played like a harp on its side, or like a guitar on its back, but not really exactly like either of those. The sound is beautiful, can be picked, strummed or pressed. What is it? (more…)

Melody Gardot

Melody Gardot

It’s been a while since I went to a live gig. This weekend we headed down to the Colston Hall to check out the Bristol Jazz Festival, holding two tickets tightly in my hand.

 

I love jazz. But Melody is more than a jazz artist, she is a show-woman and a talented instrumentalist. Her vocals were exquisite – exploring the whole range of what her voice can do, creating atmosphere and holding us captive. One thing I loved is that it wasn’t all about the vocals; each band member was a brilliant musician, and each were showcased with solos throughout the evening.

 

The final tune was the gorgeous preacherman where the audience was invited to join in with a catchy riff. As we all joined in you could hear a few harmonies floating up from the chairs as Melody sang out over the top. It felt like we had joined her on the stage momentarily. Lush.

 

Check out Melody’s recent album here.

Amaluna

Amaluna

So, my sister turns 21 this year, and to mark the occasion we went to see the Cirque de Soleil, an amazing acrobatic more-than-a-circus at the Royal Albert Hall. I have fallen in love with the wide circular building, the tiers of seats, and moons of acoustic domes in the ceiling. The set was very avatar-like in blues and greens with ambient forest sounds. The acrobatics were incredible, and while entranced by them it took me a few moments to realise that the music was all from a live band, partially shielded from view by green tendrils of the forest floor. A vocalist dressed in black standing on an illuminated basin of water cast ambient vocals out across the arena. There were no words, unless they were in the strange language of the island of Amaluna, but somehow you could feel the meaning of the music by the tone, emotion and, interestingly, the vowel sounds that she chose.

The change in vowels changes the shape of the resonators in your vocal apparatus, and this vocalist exploited all of them, allowing harmonics to rise and fall, changing the timbre, volume and intensity. Clever stuff. A few times I found myself watching her instead of the gymnastic feats on the stage. Mesmerising. All in all, it was artistic showmanship at its best.

Rock the Record

Rock the Record

Last Friday I headed on down to Rock the Record, a charity fundraising event celebrating 50 years of youth counselling charity Off the Record. I was part of Pappa J and the Crinks who got together for one night, and one night only, to support this fab organisation. We arrived for sound check to find the venue already buzzing.  There were banners, bands, beers, burgers, jugglers, icecream, facepaints and an ace line-up of live music.

OTR are all about empowering young people to thrive through the provision of free mental health services and through challenging social and structural inequalities. Yes! It was a privelege to open the night as a Crink, with a few covers, before handing over to a fab band of young people, who picked some Hendrix and other ace covers to rock out to. You can find The Black and Whites here. The night picked up speed and volume with Last Night’s Victory and Friday’s Ashes, culminating in the roar of headliners Koshiro. Definitely good to have a BBQ on hand to feed up after a good sing.